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Posts Tagged ‘water’

This week at the Museum, we have a plethora of sustainability themed programming all leading up to our Earth Day celebration next weekend.

Throughout the week, there will be eco-art projects for all ages where kids can use recycled materials to make beautiful sculptures.

On Wednesday, explore our geothermal exhibit and experiment with water, hoses, and coils to learn how we use the temperature of the earth under the museum to heat or cool our building!


Visit Thursday to learn why Bamboo is a sustainable choice for floors, furniture, and even clothes. Come down to the Greenhouse to make your own Bamboo cutting to take home!

Visit Friday to learn how dams can damage ecosystems by rerouting natural waterways. Build your own dam in Neighborhood Nature.

Enjoy our special Live Animal Encounters throughout the week. We’ll be focusing of native critters, endangered animals, and invasive species.

We also have a very special Animal Encounter next Saturday. Drop by the garden and meet the chickens of BK Farmyards! These soft red beauties will eat greens out of your hand or sit in your lap if you dare!

Check out our full Calendar of Events.

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Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

Methane is a gas found in rotting food and farts! It sounds (and smells) gross, but methane can also be used for fuel to create energy. This treatment plant collects methane and turns it into fuel. It is also the only wastewater treatment plant in the city open to the public. Learn more at the Visitor Center or check out the nature walk on site.

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is located at the corner of Greenpoint Avenue and Humboldt Street. Take the G toGreenpoint Avenue.

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is an example of Watch Waste.

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When Brooklyn Children’s Museum was renovated in 2008, all new bathrooms were fitted with low-flow water features. In fact, our boy’s bathrooms even have completely waterless urinals!

The water conservation exhibit helps kids understand the need for low flow by talking about just how much water is used by common features. Kids turn a know, pull a lever, or press a button and find out how much water is used by a bath or a shower.

One popular comparison is between an open fire hydrant and a fire hydrant with a sprinkler cap. The former (displayed on the left) uses a shocking 1,000 gallons per minute of water! That is so much water that it is both wasteful and dangerous – this much water causes decreased water pressure to nearby buildings, a problem in the case of a real fire.

To prevent this problem, you can go to your neighborhood firehouse and ask them to install a sprinkler cap (displayed on the right). Hydrants with sprinkler caps use only 15 gallons of water per minute, a huge reduction.

To learn more, check out the water conservation exhibit, on the Lower Level, across from Fantasia in the Science Inquiry Center.

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Earlier, we mentioned available grants for watershed education projects. In addition to those, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection is offering grants specifically for watershed forestry bus tours. Grants are available to cover day and overnight programs.

According to their website, grants are available to schools for 4-12th grade student trips, colleges and universities, youth groups, and other organizations within New York City or the Catskill/Delaware and Croton watersheds. Applications are due by January 15, 2012, so if you have an idea, find out more on the DEP’s website.

The after school program here at Brooklyn Children's Museum did a tree survey recently; what would you do with a forest field trip?

Tomorrow, we’re back to the idea of waste management with a post about what do with an extra evergreen tree you may have laying around your house.

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Last week, we mentioned the Magic School Bus At the Waterworks and yesterday we featured Rain. Here are some other fantastic water books you may want to read with younger students:

Drip! Drop!: How Water Gets to Your Tap by Barbara Seulig is written for younger readers than the Magic School Bus and covers both the water cycle and a basic introduction to water purification.

Water, Water by Eloise Greenfield is written for PK students. This very simple book takes students through places they may have seen water and helps them identify just how much water can be found around them: wading, fishing, drinking, or watching water.

Water by Frank Asch is another simple and beautifully illustrated book that tells the story of the water around us from obvious examples (like rivers) to the less obvious (like clouds and dew). The book also shows water’s importance in an urban setting – putting out fires and washing cars.

I Get Wet is designed to inspire all kinds of scientific inquiry. Written for early learners, the book asks questions that require experimentation, leading students to be curious and try out the experiments the book suggests.

And that’s all for early childhood water books for today – check back later for water books for older readers. It’s rainy here in Brooklyn today – we hope these books and the Rain yesterday give you some inspirations for water-focused classroom books.

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Rain

Last week, we mentioned the Magic School Bus At the Waterworks, which is a fantastic book for talking about how water moves from rain to tap, but it’s really more of an elementary book.

Rain by Robert Kalan is designed for pre-literate students. The color-coded words make the shapes of clouds, sky, and rain helping students see the idea and read it, too.

The book is designed to encourage curiosity and will lead to conversations about where water comes from and what it does in our daily lives.

Tomorrow: more water books to read with your young learners.

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Are you teaching about water in New York City or the West-of-Hudson (WOH) watershed? If so, consider applying for a 2012-2013 grant from the Catskill Watershed Corporation. Grants are offered in partnership with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and are intended to support

“education projects and programs that help increase awareness of the human and natural history of the WOH Watershed and the New York City water supply system; the critical role of communities in caring for water quality in the watershed, the importance of water conservation,the history and contemporary use and operation of the vast water system, or the cultural and biological diversity of the city’s WOH Watershed.”

In particular, they are looking for proposals that will lead to education about the causes and impacts of flooding or climate change.

Maybe you want to study green roofs and their relationship with Combined Sewage Overflows. Maybe you want to look at how weather and climate are changing in and around New York City and how that affects waterways. Maybe you have an idea for a new way to explain the water cycle to your students and want the funding to be able to do so.

Or perhaps you want the money to enable your students to participate in existing programs, including trips to environmental education centers, cultural programs, Trout in the Classroom or classroom models for teaching about water quality.

For more information, consult the Catskill Watershed Corporation’s website or call 845-586-1400, ext. 29 (toll-free 877-WAT-SHED) to obtain an application packet by mail. Questions may also be directed to galusha@cwconline.org. Grant proposals are due by Wednesday, February 1, 2012.

What water project would you do with your students if you had funding?

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