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Posts Tagged ‘science experiments’

Snails make the perfect classroom pets. They aren’t terribly high maintenance but they require enough care that students get to play an important role in maintaining a healthy colony.

A fish tank makes an ideal snail enclosure but those can run a little pricey- a plastic bin with a removable lid makes an inexpensive alternative. It should be at least around 20 cm x 20 cm. The bigger your enclosure, the easier it will be to monitor humidity levels. For more tips on building your own tank, check out this site.

You can build the habitat of your snail enclosure as a class project. Collect dirt, rock, leaves,  and sticks. You can even throw in real moss and ferns to help with humidity levels. Bricks, limestone, cement, or old sea shells add a source of calcium that the snails will grind up and use to “build” their shells.

Any gardener would be happy to let you collect plant-eating snails from their garden. Perhaps your class’s snail collecting could involve visits to local community gardens!

Beside the standard scientific observation we covered in our last post, here are some daily chores and activities your students can take turns doing to ensure happy gastropods:

  • Spray down their enclosure. If you don’t keep snails moist with a daily spritz, they’ll seal themselves up in their shell with a film of dried up slime. But don’t water too much — too much moisture and you’ll get stinky mold in the enclosure.
  • Add some fresh lettuce greens to your tank and watch how quickly the snails chomp away. You can try out other fruits and veggies to see what your snails prefer.
  • Have your students devise some experiments to do with your snails. The book Snailology has some some fun quandaries to work with:
    • Build a maze! Can find their way around corners and through obstacles?
    • Snail circus! Build a snail tight rope with some string and watch the snails race across. Do they “walk the line” or prefer a more windy path?
    • Test the weight bearing power of a snail! Tape a string and a penny to their shell. Can they pull a penny? Can they pull a quarter?
    • Are snails attracted to darkness or will they seek out the light?

    Let us know if you have snail success!

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