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Posts Tagged ‘culture’

Are you interested in incorporating art into your garden study? Great!

Yesterday, we talked about the culture gardens made by Greta. She took plants from each of 14 countries around the world and made mini-gardens to help kids learn about the culture of each country. But she wasn’t done there!

Greta also decided to make a mural showing off her research. She picked plants common in certain parts of the world and placed them on top of a world map:

Then, Greta got to painting, with help of kids in our after-school program and one of our teen interns. In April, it looked like this:

And here it is in August:

Right now, there are too many leaves on the trees to get you an image of the whole mural, but after the leaves fall off, we promise more photographs! Check out Greta’s blog for updates.

And Happy (almost) Thanksgiving to you all – we hope your festive meals this week are as fantastically delicious as the cornucopia Greta drew in the world map above!

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One of our mottoes here at Brooklyn Children’s Museum is a Marty Markowitz quotation:

Brooklyn is home to everyone from everywhere!

We firmly believe that here and love the opportunity to reflect the cultural diversity of our borough (and New York City, too) and the cultures of the people who have moved to Brooklyn from all around the world. Brooklyn Children’s Museum has an exhibit called World Brooklyn that shrinks Brooklyn stores to kid-size and shows the ethnic diversity of our borough through these stores.

Well, Greta had a great idea for teaching kids about culture through gardens, so she picked 14 countries from around the world: Mexico, China, Uganda, Italy, Peru, Thailand, Nigeria, Israel, Brazil, India, Japan, England, Russia, France, and Jamaica. Then, for each country, she picked a handful of representative plants and planted them together.

Above, the finished gardens are laid out in Brooklyn Children’s Museum’s Greenhouse.

As you can see, each garden also has labels that tell kids something about the country. The labels talk about how the plants are used, how they smell, what they feel like, and often how the plant is used in local cooking. The Thai garden, for example, has the following label with information about the ingredients in Pad Thai:

Another great example is the Peruvian garden!

You might not do 14 of these in your classroom, but it’s quite easy to pick a country you’re studying and grow 3 or 4 plants from that country to help students combine science and social studies knowledge and have an even richer understanding of culture.

You can also link this to the arts – check back tomorrow for information about that!

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