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Archive for the ‘Field Trips’ Category

Fall has arrived and we’ve been revving up for the start of our fall school programs at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum. Our field trip lineup has been revamped with some new offerings and we also brought back an old favorite we’ve been missing called “Migration Sensation”. In this feathery program, students investigate the adaptations that let birds take flight, learn all about how and why birds fly long distances in the spring and fall, and play a super fun migration game. In the game, the students transform into migratory birds; they must collect food and avoid human hazards on their way to distant wintering grounds. If you’re interested in booking an educational field trip for your school group, visit our School Programs page.

In preparation for a Migration Sensation visit, take your students to a park for some urban bird watching! Your class could even become part of a larger community of bird scientist by participating in Cornell’s “Celebrate Urban Birds” Program. Order a free kit for your classroom which includes facts about 16 species of local birds.

When I walked into the BCM garden today, I was greeted by a chorus of noisy grackles pecking around for seeds. Take a listen to their boisterous chorus!

When grackles migrate, they only travel short distances. Many stay put in the same place all winter. Scarce food is usually the main bird migration motive and grackles are extremely opportunistic. They’ll eat anything from seeds to bugs to trash so you’re likely to be able to spot them all winter long.

File:Common Grackle male RWD.jpg

Did you notice their beautiful iridescent feathers?

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Yesterday, we had some feathered visitors from BKFarmyards join us at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum for a program sponsored by National Grid. Take a look at the fun!

Madison and Stephanie arrived on a bicycle with three hens visiting from their coup at Imani Garden down the street. These ladies are graduates of the Chicken Apprenticeship program offered by BK Farmyards. The program runs for three months and leaves you with the knowledge to begin raising your own hens in the city! The program begin at the end of May and applications are being accepted now.

Kids had the chance to pet the chickens and asked some awesome questions: What is that red thing called on the top of their heads? A comb! Why do the Chickens peck at the ground? They’re looking for worms and seeds to munch on.

Brave visitors  had the chance to feed the chickens leafy greens from our garden. And then…

We got a surprise when one of the hens laid an egg on the spot! Talk about getting kids to understand where their food comes from…they were able to feel the warm egg! 

I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know these friendly hens. Have you ever been to Imani Garden? BK Farmyards offers field trips and farm tours for school groups. You can visit Imani Garden or have the chickens come to you! Contact them at eggs@bkfarmyards.org.

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Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

Methane is a gas found in rotting food and farts! It sounds (and smells) gross, but methane can also be used for fuel to create energy. This treatment plant collects methane and turns it into fuel. It is also the only wastewater treatment plant in the city open to the public. Learn more at the Visitor Center or check out the nature walk on site.

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is located at the corner of Greenpoint Avenue and Humboldt Street. Take the G toGreenpoint Avenue.

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is an example of Watch Waste.

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Marine Park is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

Marine Park is the biggest park in Brooklyn. It’s full of natural grasslands and salt marshes, which enable animals and plants to thrive, right here in Brooklyn. You can visit the Salt Marsh Nature Center, learn from an Urban Park Ranger, play in a playground or ball field, find a horseshoe crab, walk a nature trail and so much more.

Marine Park is a Forever Wild site. For more information about the park, consult the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation.

The entrance to Marine Park is located at East 33rd Street and Avenue U. You can take the B3 Bus, which will let you off right at the entrance.

By the way, Marine Park is not the only nature center in the city. You can find listings for other nature centers here.

Marine Park is an example of Grow Green.

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East New York Farms is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

Local farms are good for the environment and for us. Shipping food locally uses less energy.

Like many local farms, East New York Farms uses Earth-friendly growing practices. They avoid using chemicals, which keeps both the earth and your food clean, healthy and yummy.

East New York Farms is located on Schenck Avenue between New Lots Avenue and Livonia Avenue. You can take the 3 to Van Siclen Avenue. For more information about public activities there, checkout their website.

East New York Farms is an example of Use Less.

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The roof of the Coney Island – Stillwell Avenue terminal is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

Next time you visit the beach, notice the solar panels on the roof of the Stillwell Avenue subway stop in Coney Island. These use the sun’s energy so the Transit Authority doesn’t have to buy as much power. It’s a creative way to use the roof space.

As your D, F, N, or Q train pulls into the station, you can see the solar panels with your own eyes. For more information, check out the MTA’s website with more information about green buildings, including Coney Island and solar panels on top of Roosevelt Avenue-74th Street Station in Queens.

This terminal roof is an example of Re-Invent Your City.

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Brooklyn Bridge Park is part of sustainable Brooklyn!

One of the most beautiful parks in the city used to be shipping piers. Check out free movies in the summer, playgrounds and new habitats for local animals. Plus, Brooklyn Bridge Park catches storm water, cleans it and uses it to water plants when the weather is dry.

You can take the the 2/3 to Clark Street, the A/C to High Street, or the F to York Street. For more about the park and it’s offerings for children, check out their website, as well as a whole page of sustainability information.

Brooklyn Bridge Park is an example of Re-Invent Your City.

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